The Up To The Immediate Present Guide To CIPM Prep

It is impossible to pass IAPP CIPM exam without any help in the short term. Come to Ucertify soon and find the most advanced, correct and guaranteed IAPP CIPM practice questions. You will get a surprising result by our Most recent Certified Information Privacy Manager (CIPM) practice guides.

Online CIPM free questions and answers of New Version:

NEW QUESTION 1
What is the main purpose of a privacy program audit?

  • A. To mitigate the effects of a privacy breach.
  • B. To justify a privacy department budget increase.
  • C. To make decisions on privacy staff roles and responsibilities.
  • D. To ensure the adequacy of data protection procedures.

Answer: D

NEW QUESTION 2
Formosa International operates in 20 different countries including the United States and France. What organizational approach would make complying with a number of different regulations easier?

  • A. Data mapping.
  • B. Fair Information Practices.
  • C. Rationalizing requirements.
  • D. Decentralized privacy management.

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 3
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
As the Director of data protection for Consolidated Records Corporation, you are justifiably pleased with your accomplishments so far. Your hiring was precipitated by warnings from regulatory agencies following a series of relatively minor data breaches that could easily have been worse. However, you have not had a reportable incident for the three years that you have been with the company. In fact, you consider your program a model that others in the data storage industry may note in their own program development.
You started the program at Consolidated from a jumbled mix of policies and procedures and worked toward coherence across departments and throughout operations. You were aided along the way by the program's sponsor, the vice president of operations, as well as by a Privacy Team that started from a clear understanding of the need for change.
Initially, your work was greeted with little confidence or enthusiasm by the company's "old guard" among both the executive team and frontline personnel working with data and interfacing with clients. Through the use of metrics that showed the costs not only of the breaches that had occurred, but also projections of the costs that easily could occur given the current state of operations, you soon had the leaders and key decision-makers largely on your side. Many of the other employees were more resistant, but face-to-face meetings with each department and the development of a baseline privacy training program achieved sufficient "buy-in" to begin putting the proper procedures into place.
Now, privacy protection is an accepted component of all current operations involving personal or protected data and must be part of the end product of any process of technological development. While your approach is not systematic, it is fairly effective.
You are left contemplating:
What must be done to maintain the program and develop it beyond just a data breach prevention program? How can you build on your success?
What are the next action steps?
What practice would afford the Director the most rigorous way to check on the program's compliance with laws, regulations and industry best practices?

  • A. Auditing.
  • B. Monitoring.
  • C. Assessment.
  • D. Forensics.

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 4
In privacy protection, what is a "covered entity"?

  • A. Personal data collected by a privacy organization.
  • B. An organization subject to the privacy provisions of HIPAA.
  • C. A privacy office or team fully responsible for protecting personal information.
  • D. Hidden gaps in privacy protection that may go unnoticed without expert analysis.

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 5
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
It's just what you were afraid of. Without consulting you, the information technology director at your organization launched a new initiative to encourage employees to use personal devices for conducting business. The initiative made purchasing a new, high-specification laptop computer an attractive option, with discounted laptops paid for as a payroll deduction spread over a year of paychecks. The organization is also paying the sales taxes. It's a great deal, and after a month, more than half the organization's employees have signed on and acquired new laptops. Walking through the facility, you see them happily customizing and comparing notes on their new computers, and at the end of the day, most take their laptops with them, potentially carrying personal data to their homes or other unknown locations. It's enough to give you data- protection nightmares, and you've pointed out to the information technology Director and many others in the organization the potential hazards of this new practice, including the inevitability of eventual data loss or theft.
Today you have in your office a representative of the organization's marketing department who shares with you, reluctantly, a story with potentially serious consequences. The night before, straight from work, with laptop in hand, he went to the Bull and Horn Pub to play billiards with his friends. A fine night of sport and socializing began, with the laptop "safely" tucked on a bench, beneath his jacket. Later that night, when it was time to depart, he retrieved the jacket, but the laptop was gone. It was not beneath the bench or on another bench nearby. The waitstaff had not seen it. His friends were not playing a joke on him. After a sleepless night, he confirmed it this morning, stopping by the pub to talk to the cleanup crew. They had not found it. The laptop was missing. Stolen, it seems. He looks at you, embarrassed and upset.
You ask him if the laptop contains any personal data from clients, and, sadly, he nods his head, yes. He believes it contains files on about 100 clients, including names, addresses and governmental identification numbers. He sighs and places his head in his hands in despair.
What should you do first to ascertain additional information about the loss of data?

  • A. Interview the person reporting the incident following a standard protocol.
  • B. Call the police to investigate even if you are unsure a crime occurred.
  • C. Investigate the background of the person reporting the incident.
  • D. Check company records of the latest backups to see what data may be recoverable.

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 6
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Manasa is a product manager at Omnipresent Omnimedia, where she is responsible for leading the development of the company's flagship product, the Handy Helper. The Handy Helper is an application that can be used in the home to manage family calendars, do online shopping, and schedule doctor appointments. After having had a successful launch in the United States, the Handy Helper is about to be made available for purchase worldwide.
The packaging and user guide for the Handy Helper indicate that it is a "privacy friendly" product suitable for the whole family, including children, but does not provide any further detail or privacy notice. In order to use the application, a family creates a single account, and the primary user has access to all information about the other users. Upon start up, the primary user must check a box consenting to receive marketing emails from Omnipresent Omnimedia and selected marketing partners in order to be able to use the application.
Sanjay, the head of privacy at Omnipresent Omnimedia, was working on an agreement with a European distributor of Handy Helper when he fielded many Questions about the product from the distributor. Sanjay needed to look more closely at the product in order to be able to answer the Questions as he was not involved in the product development process.
In speaking with the product team, he learned that the Handy Helper collected and stored all of a user's sensitive medical information for the medical appointment scheduler. In fact, all of the user's information is stored by Handy Helper for the additional purpose of creating additional products and to analyze usage of the product. This data is all stored in the cloud and is encrypted both during transmission and at rest.
Consistent with the CEO's philosophy that great new product ideas can come from anyone, all Omnipresent Omnimedia employees have access to user data under a program called Eureka. Omnipresent Omnimedia is hoping that at some point in the future, the data will reveal insights that could be used to create a fully automated application that runs on artificial intelligence, but as of yet, Eureka is not well-defined and is considered a long-term goal.
What element of the Privacy by Design (PbD) framework might the Handy Helper violate?

  • A. Failure to obtain opt-in consent to marketing.
  • B. Failure to observe data localization requirements.
  • C. Failure to implement the least privilege access standard.
  • D. Failure to integrate privacy throughout the system development life cycle.

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 7
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
As the Director of data protection for Consolidated Records Corporation, you are justifiably pleased with your accomplishments so far. Your hiring was precipitated by warnings from regulatory agencies following a series of relatively minor data breaches that could easily have been worse. However, you have not had a reportable incident for the three years that you have been with the company. In fact, you consider your program a model that others in the data storage industry may note in their own program development.
You started the program at Consolidated from a jumbled mix of policies and procedures and worked toward coherence across departments and throughout operations. You were aided along the way by the program's sponsor, the vice president of operations, as well as by a Privacy Team that started from a clear understanding of the need for change.
Initially, your work was greeted with little confidence or enthusiasm by the company's "old guard" among both the executive team and frontline personnel working with data and interfacing with clients. Through the use of metrics that showed the costs not only of the breaches that had occurred, but also projections of the costs that easily could occur given the current state of operations, you soon had the leaders and key decision-makers largely on your side. Many of the other employees were more resistant, but face-to-face meetings with each department and the development of a baseline privacy training program achieved sufficient "buy-in" to begin putting the proper procedures into place.
Now, privacy protection is an accepted component of all current operations involving personal or protected data and must be part of the end product of any process of technological development. While your approach is not systematic, it is fairly effective.
You are left contemplating:
What must be done to maintain the program and develop it beyond just a data breach prevention program? How can you build on your success?
What are the next action steps?
How can Consolidated's privacy training program best be further developed?

  • A. Through targeted curricula designed for specific departments.
  • B. By adopting e-learning to reduce the need for instructors.
  • C. By using industry standard off-the-shelf programs.
  • D. Through a review of recent data breaches.

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 8
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
It's just what you were afraid of. Without consulting you, the information technology director at your organization launched a new initiative to encourage employees to use personal devices for conducting business. The initiative made purchasing a new, high-specification laptop computer an attractive option, with discounted laptops paid for as a payroll deduction spread over a year of paychecks. The organization is also paying the sales taxes. It's a great deal, and after a month, more than half the organization's employees have signed on and acquired new laptops. Walking through the facility, you see them happily customizing and comparing notes on their new computers, and at the end of the day, most take their laptops with them, potentially carrying personal data to their homes or other unknown locations. It's enough to give you data- protection nightmares, and you've pointed out to the information technology Director and many others in the organization the potential hazards of this new practice, including the inevitability of eventual data loss or theft.
Today you have in your office a representative of the organization's marketing department who shares with you, reluctantly, a story with potentially serious consequences. The night before, straight from work, with laptop in hand, he went to the Bull and Horn Pub to play billiards with his friends. A fine night of sport and socializing began, with the laptop "safely" tucked on a bench, beneath his jacket. Later that night, when it was time to depart, he retrieved the jacket, but the laptop was gone. It was not beneath the bench or on another bench nearby. The waitstaff had not seen it. His friends were not playing a joke on him. After a sleepless night, he confirmed it this morning, stopping by the pub to talk to the cleanup crew. They had not found it. The laptop was missing. Stolen, it seems. He looks at you, embarrassed and upset.
You ask him if the laptop contains any personal data from clients, and, sadly, he nods his head, yes. He believes it contains files on about 100 clients, including names, addresses and governmental identification numbers. He sighs and places his head in his hands in despair.
From a business standpoint, what is the most productive way to view employee use of personal equipment for work-related tasks?

  • A. The use of personal equipment is a cost-effective measure that leads to no greater security risks than are always present in a modern organization.
  • B. Any computer or other equipment is company property whenever it is used for company business.
  • C. While the company may not own the equipment, it is required to protect the business-related data on any equipment used by its employees.
  • D. The use of personal equipment must be reduced as it leads to inevitable security risks.

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 9
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Amira is thrilled about the sudden expansion of NatGen. As the joint Chief Executive Officer (CEO) with her long-time business partner Sadie, Amira has watched the company grow into a major competitor in the green energy market. The current line of products includes wind turbines, solar energy panels, and equipment for geothermal systems. A talented team of developers means that NatGen's line of products will only continue to grow.
With the expansion, Amira and Sadie have received advice from new senior staff members brought on to help manage the company's growth. One recent suggestion has been to combine the legal and security functions of the company to ensure observance of privacy laws and the company's own privacy policy. This sounds overly complicated to Amira, who wants departments to be able to use, collect, store, and dispose of customer data in ways that will best suit their needs. She does not want administrative oversight and complex structuring to get in the way of people doing innovative work.
Sadie has a similar outlook. The new Chief Information Officer (CIO) has proposed what Sadie believes is an unnecessarily long timetable for designing a new privacy program. She has assured him that NatGen will use the best possible equipment for electronic storage of customer and employee data. She simply needs a list of equipment and an estimate of its cost. But the CIO insists that many issues are necessary to consider before the company gets to that stage.
Regardless, Sadie and Amira insist on giving employees space to do their jobs. Both CEOs want to entrust the monitoring of employee policy compliance to low-level managers. Amira and Sadie believe these managers can adjust the company privacy policy according to what works best for their particular departments. NatGen's CEOs know that flexible interpretations of the privacy policy in the name of promoting green energy would be highly unlikely to raise any concerns with their customer base, as long as the data is always used in course of normal business activities.
Perhaps what has been most perplexing to Sadie and Amira has been the CIO's recommendation to institute a privacy compliance hotline. Sadie and Amira have relented on this point, but they hope to compromise by allowing employees to take turns handling reports of privacy policy violations. The implementation will be easy because the employees need no special preparation. They will simply have to document any concerns they hear.
Sadie and Amira are aware that it will be challenging to stay true to their principles and guard against corporate culture strangling creativity and employee morale. They hope that all senior staff will see the benefit of trying a unique approach.
What Data Lifecycle Management (DLM) principle should the company follow if they end up allowing departments to interpret the privacy policy differently?

  • A. Prove the authenticity of the company's records.
  • B. Arrange for official credentials for staff members.
  • C. Adequately document reasons for inconsistencies.
  • D. Create categories to reflect degrees of data importance.

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 10
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
As they company’s new chief executive officer, Thomas Goddard wants to be known as a leader in data protection. Goddard recently served as the chief financial officer of Hoopy.com, a pioneer in online video
viewing with millions of users around the world. Unfortunately, Hoopy is infamous within privacy protection circles for its ethically Questionable practices, including unauthorized sales of personal data to marketers. Hoopy also was the target of credit card data theft that made headlines around the world, as at least two million credit card numbers were thought to have been pilfered despite the company’s claims that “appropriate” data protection safeguards were in place. The scandal affected the company’s business as competitors were quick to market an increased level of protection while offering similar entertainment and media content. Within three weeks after the scandal broke, Hoopy founder and CEO Maxwell Martin, Goddard’s mentor, was forced to step down.
Goddard, however, seems to have landed on his feet, securing the CEO position at your company, Medialite, which is just emerging from its start-up phase. He sold the company’s board and investors on his vision of Medialite building its brand partly on the basis of industry-leading data protection standards and procedures. He may have been a key part of a lapsed or even rogue organization in matters of privacy but now he claims to be reformed and a true believer in privacy protection. In his first week on the job, he calls you into his office and explains that your primary work responsibility is to bring his vision for privacy to life. But you also detect some reservations. “We want Medialite to have absolutely the highest standards,” he says. “In fact, I want us to be able to say that we are the clear industry leader in privacy and data protection. However, I also need to be a responsible steward of the company’s finances. So, while I want the best solutions across the board, they also need to be cost effective.”
You are told to report back in a week’s time with your recommendations. Charged with this ambiguous mission, you depart the executive suite, already considering your next steps.
What metric can Goddard use to assess whether costs associated with implementing new privacy protections are justified?

  • A. Compliance ratio
  • B. Cost-effective mean
  • C. Return on investment
  • D. Implementation measure

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 11
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Natalia, CFO of the Nationwide Grill restaurant chain, had never seen her fellow executives so anxious. Last week, a data processing firm used by the company reported that its system may have been hacked, and customer data such as names, addresses, and birthdays may have been compromised. Although the attempt was proven unsuccessful, the scare has prompted several Nationwide Grill executives to Question the company's privacy program at today's meeting.
Alice, a vice president, said that the incident could have opened the door to lawsuits, potentially damaging Nationwide Grill's market position. The Chief Information Officer (CIO), Brendan, tried to assure her that
even if there had been an actual breach, the chances of a successful suit against the company were slim. But Alice remained unconvinced.
Spencer – a former CEO and currently a senior advisor – said that he had always warned against the use of contractors for data processing. At the very least, he argued, they should be held contractually liable for telling customers about any security incidents. In his view, Nationwide Grill should not be forced to soil the company name for a problem it did not cause.
One of the business development (BD) executives, Haley, then spoke, imploring everyone to see reason. "Breaches can happen, despite organizations' best efforts," she remarked. "Reasonable preparedness is key." She reminded everyone of the incident seven years ago when the large grocery chain Tinkerton's had its financial information compromised after a large order of Nationwide Grill frozen dinners. As a long-time BD executive with a solid understanding of Tinkerton's's corporate culture, built up through many years of cultivating relationships, Haley was able to successfully manage the company's incident response.
Spencer replied that acting with reason means allowing security to be handled by the security functions within the company – not BD staff. In a similar way, he said, Human Resources (HR) needs to do a better job training employees to prevent incidents. He pointed out that Nationwide Grill employees are overwhelmed with posters, emails, and memos from both HR and the ethics department related to the company's privacy program. Both the volume and the duplication of information means that it is often ignored altogether.
Spencer said, "The company needs to dedicate itself to its privacy program and set regular in-person trainings for all staff once a month."
Alice responded that the suggestion, while well-meaning, is not practical. With many locations, local HR departments need to have flexibility with their training schedules. Silently, Natalia agreed.
What is the most realistic step the organization can take to help diminish liability in the event of another incident?

  • A. Requiring the vendor to perform periodic internal audits.
  • B. Specifying mandatory data protection practices in vendor contracts.
  • C. Keeping the majority of processing activities within the organization.
  • D. Obtaining customer consent for any third-party processing of personal data.

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 12
An organization's privacy officer was just notified by the benefits manager that she accidentally sent out the retirement enrollment report of all employees to a wrong vendor.
Which of the following actions should the privacy officer take first?

  • A. Perform a risk of harm analysis.
  • B. Report the incident to law enforcement.
  • C. Contact the recipient to delete the email.
  • D. Send firm-wide email notification to employees.

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 13
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
You lead the privacy office for a company that handles information from individuals living in several countries throughout Europe and the Americas. You begin that morning’s privacy review when a contracts officer sends you a message asking for a phone call. The message lacks clarity and detail, but you presume that data was lost.
When you contact the contracts officer, he tells you that he received a letter in the mail from a vendor stating that the vendor improperly shared information about your customers. He called the vendor and confirmed that your company recently surveyed exactly 2000 individuals about their most recent healthcare experience and sent those surveys to the vendor to transcribe it into a database, but the vendor forgot to encrypt the database as promised in the contract. As a result, the vendor has lost control of the data.
The vendor is extremely apologetic and offers to take responsibility for sending out the notifications. They tell you they set aside 2000 stamped postcards because that should reduce the time it takes to get the notice in the mail. One side is limited to their logo, but the other side is blank and they will accept whatever you want to write. You put their offer on hold and begin to develop the text around the space constraints. You are content to let the vendor’s logo be associated with the notification.
The notification explains that your company recently hired a vendor to store information about their most recent experience at St. Sebastian Hospital’s Clinic for Infectious Diseases. The vendor did not encrypt the information and no longer has control of it. All 2000 affected individuals are invited to sign-up for email notifications about their information. They simply need to go to your company’s website and watch a quick advertisement, then provide their name, email address, and month and year of birth.
You email the incident-response council for their buy-in before 9 a.m. If anything goes wrong in this situation, you want to diffuse the blame across your colleagues. Over the next eight hours, everyone emails their comments back and forth. The consultant who leads the incident-response team notes that it is his first day with the company, but he has been in other industries for 45 years and will do his best. One of the three lawyers on the council causes the conversation to veer off course, but it eventually gets back on track. At the end of the day, they vote to proceed with the notification you wrote and use the vendor’s postcards.
Shortly after the vendor mails the postcards, you learn the data was on a server that was stolen, and make the decision to have your company offer credit monitoring services. A quick internet search finds a credit monitoring company with a convincing name: Credit Under Lock and Key (CRUDLOK). Your sales rep has never handled a contract for 2000 people, but develops a proposal in about a day which says CRUDLOK will:
* 1. Send an enrollment invitation to everyone the day after the contract is signed.
* 2. Enroll someone with just their first name and the last-4 of their national identifier.
* 3. Monitor each enrollee’s credit for two years from the date of enrollment.
* 4. Send a monthly email with their credit rating and offers for credit-related services at market rates.
* 5. Charge your company 20% of the cost of any credit restoration.
You execute the contract and the enrollment invitations are emailed to the 2000 individuals. Three days later you sit down and document all that went well and all that could have gone better. You put it in a file to reference the next time an incident occurs.
Which of the following was done CORRECTLY during the above incident?

  • A. The process by which affected individuals sign up for email notifications
  • B. Your assessment of which credit monitoring company you should hire
  • C. The speed at which you sat down to reflect and document the incident
  • D. Finding a vendor who will offer the affected individuals additional services

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 14
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Edufox has hosted an annual convention of users of its famous e-learning software platform, and over time, it has become a grand event. It fills one of the large downtown conference hotels and overflows into the others, with several thousand attendees enjoying three days of presentations, panel discussions and networking. The convention is the centerpiece of the company's product rollout schedule and a great training opportunity for current users. The sales force also encourages prospective clients to attend to get a better sense of the ways in which the system can be customized to meet diverse needs and understand that when they buy into this system, they are joining a community that feels like family.
This year's conference is only three weeks away, and you have just heard news of a new initiative supporting it: a smartphone app for attendees. The app will support late registration, highlight the featured presentations and provide a mobile version of the conference program. It also links to a restaurant reservation system with the best cuisine in the areas featured. "It's going to be great," the developer, Deidre Hoffman, tells you, "if, that is, we actually get it working!" She laughs nervously but explains that because of the tight time frame she'd been given to build the app, she outsourced the job to a local firm. "It's just three young people," she says, "but they do great work." She describes some of the other apps they have built. When asked how they were selected for this job, Deidre shrugs. "They do good work, so I chose them."
Deidre is a terrific employee with a strong track record. That's why she's been charged to deliver this rushed project. You're sure she has the best interests of the company at heart, and you don't doubt that she's under pressure to meet a deadline that cannot be pushed back. However, you have concerns about the app's handling of personal data and its security safeguards. Over lunch in the break room, you start to talk to her about it, but she quickly tries to reassure you, "I'm sure with your help we can fix any security issues if we have to, but I doubt there'll be any. These people build apps for a living, and they know what they're doing. You worry too much, but that's why you're so good at your job!"
You want to point out that normal protocols have NOT been followed in this matter. Which process in particular has been neglected?

  • A. Forensic inquiry.
  • B. Data mapping.
  • C. Privacy breach prevention.
  • D. Vendor due diligence vetting.

Answer: D

NEW QUESTION 15
Which is the best way to view an organization’s privacy framework?

  • A. As an industry benchmark that can apply to many organizations
  • B. As a fixed structure that directs changes in the organization
  • C. As an aspirational goal that improves the organization
  • D. As a living structure that aligns to changes in the organization

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 16
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Penny has recently joined Ace Space, a company that sells homeware accessories online, as its new privacy officer. The company is based in California but thanks to some great publicity from a social media influencer last year, the company has received an influx of sales from the EU and has set up a regional office in Ireland to support this expansion. To become familiar with Ace Space’s practices and assess what her privacy priorities will be, Penny has set up meetings with a number of colleagues to hear about the work that they have been doing and their compliance efforts.
Penny’s colleague in Marketing is excited by the new sales and the company’s plans, but is also concerned that Penny may curtail some of the growth opportunities he has planned. He tells her “I heard someone in the breakroom talking about some new privacy laws but I really don’t think it affects us. We’re just a small company. I mean we just sell accessories online, so what’s the real risk?” He has also told her that he works with a number of small companies that help him get projects completed in a hurry. “We’ve got to meet our deadlines otherwise we lose money. I just sign the contracts and get Jim in finance to push through the payment. Reviewing the contracts takes time that we just don’t have.”
In her meeting with a member of the IT team, Penny has learned that although Ace Space has taken a number of precautions to protect its website from malicious activity, it has not taken the same level of care of its physical files or internal infrastructure. Penny’s colleague in IT has told her that a former employee lost an encrypted USB key with financial data on it when he left. The company nearly lost access to their customer database last year after they fell victim to a phishing attack. Penny is told by her IT colleague that the IT team “didn’t know what to do or who should do what. We hadn’t been trained on it but we’re a small team though, so it worked out OK in the end.” Penny is concerned that these issues will compromise Ace Space’s privacy and data protection.
Penny is aware that the company has solid plans to grow its international sales and will be working closely with the CEO to give the organization a data “shake up”. Her mission is to cultivate a strong privacy culture within the company.
Penny has a meeting with Ace Space’s CEO today and has been asked to give her first impressions and an overview of her next steps.
To establish the current baseline of Ace Space’s privacy maturity, Penny should consider all of the following factors EXCEPT?

  • A. Ace Space’s documented procedures
  • B. Ace Space’s employee training program
  • C. Ace Space’s vendor engagement protocols
  • D. Ace Space’s content sharing practices on social media

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 17
Which of the following is an example of Privacy by Design (PbD)?

  • A. A company hires a professional to structure a privacy program that anticipates the increasing demands of new laws.
  • B. The human resources group develops a training program for employees to become certified in privacy policy.
  • C. A labor union insists that the details of employers' data protection methods be documented in a new contract.
  • D. The information technology group uses privacy considerations to inform the development of new networking software.

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 18
What is the main purpose in notifying data subjects of a data breach?

  • A. To avoid financial penalties and legal liability
  • B. To enable regulators to understand trends and developments that may shape the law
  • C. To ensure organizations have accountability for the sufficiency of their security measures
  • D. To allow individuals to take any actions required to protect themselves from possible consequences

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 19
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
As they company’s new chief executive officer, Thomas Goddard wants to be known as a leader in data protection. Goddard recently served as the chief financial officer of Hoopy.com, a pioneer in online video viewing with millions of users around the world. Unfortunately, Hoopy is infamous within privacy protection circles for its ethically questionable practices, including unauthorized sales of personal data to marketers. Hoopy also was the target of credit card data theft that made headlines around the world, as at least two million credit card numbers were thought to have been pilfered despite the company’s claims that “appropriate” data protection safeguards were in place. The scandal affected the company’s business as competitors were quick to market an increased level of protection while offering similar entertainment and media content. Within three weeks after the scandal broke, Hoopy founder and CEO Maxwell Martin, Goddard’s mentor, was forced to step down.
Goddard, however, seems to have landed on his feet, securing the CEO position at your company, Medialite, which is just emerging from its start-up phase. He sold the company’s board and investors on his vision of Medialite building its brand partly on the basis of industry-leading data protection standards and procedures.
He may have been a key part of a lapsed or even rogue organization in matters of privacy but now he claims to be reformed and a true believer in privacy protection. In his first week on the job, he calls you into his office and explains that your primary work responsibility is to bring his vision for privacy to life. But you also detect some reservations. “We want Medialite to have absolutely the highest standards,” he says. “In fact, I want us to be able to say that we are the clear industry leader in privacy and data protection. However, I also need to be a responsible steward of the company’s finances. So, while I want the best solutions across the board, they also need to be cost effective.”
You are told to report back in a week’s time with your recommendations. Charged with this ambiguous mission, you depart the executive suite, already considering your next steps.
You are charged with making sure that privacy safeguards are in place for new products and initiatives. What is the best way to do this?

  • A. Hold a meeting with stakeholders to create an interdepartmental protocol for new initiatives
  • B. Institute Privacy by Design principles and practices across the organization
  • C. Develop a plan for introducing privacy protections into the product development stage
  • D. Conduct a gap analysis after deployment of new products, then mend any gaps that are revealed

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 20
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Henry Home Furnishings has built high-end furniture for nearly forty years. However, the new owner, Anton, has found some degree of disorganization after touring the company headquarters. His uncle Henry had always focused on production – not data processing – and Anton is concerned. In several storage rooms, he has found paper files, disks, and old computers that appear to contain the personal data of current and former employees and customers. Anton knows that a single break-in could irrevocably damage the company's relationship with its loyal customers. He intends to set a goal of guaranteed zero loss of personal information. To this end, Anton originally planned to place restrictions on who was admitted to the physical premises of the company. However, Kenneth – his uncle's vice president and longtime confidante – wants to hold off on Anton's idea in favor of converting any paper records held at the company to electronic storage. Kenneth believes this process would only take one or two years. Anton likes this idea; he envisions a password- protected system that only he and Kenneth can access.
Anton also plans to divest the company of most of its subsidiaries. Not only will this make his job easier, but it will simplify the management of the stored data. The heads of subsidiaries like the art gallery and kitchenware store down the street will be responsible for their own information management. Then, any unneeded subsidiary data still in Anton's possession can be destroyed within the next few years.
After learning of a recent security incident, Anton realizes that another crucial step will be notifying customers. Kenneth insists that two lost hard drives in Question are not cause for concern; all of the data was encrypted and not sensitive in nature. Anton does not want to take any chances, however. He intends on sending notice letters to all employees and customers to be safe.
Anton must also check for compliance with all legislative, regulatory, and market requirements related to privacy protection. Kenneth oversaw the development of the company's online presence about ten years ago, but Anton is not confident about his understanding of recent online marketing laws. Anton is assigning another trusted employee with a law background the task of the compliance assessment. After a thorough analysis, Anton knows the company should be safe for another five years, at which time he can order another check.
Documentation of this analysis will show auditors due diligence.
Anton has started down a long road toward improved management of the company, but he knows the effort is worth it. Anton wants his uncle's legacy to continue for many years to come.
Which important principle of Data Lifecycle Management (DLM) will most likely be compromised if Anton executes his plan to limit data access to himself and Kenneth?

  • A. Practicing data minimalism.
  • B. Ensuring data retrievability.
  • C. Implementing clear policies.
  • D. Ensuring adequacy of infrastructure.

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 21
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